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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of changing social position of the elderly in contemporary urban China found in the catalog.

changing social position of the elderly in contemporary urban China

Pei Lin

changing social position of the elderly in contemporary urban China

by Pei Lin

  • 290 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aged -- China -- Case studies.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Pei Lin.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination108 leaves, bound ;
    Number of Pages108
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15380190M

    Cultural beliefs shape social norms and values surrounding the aging process and the role of older people. These beliefs about aging are not static—they shift and change as society. evolves. Like other social groups, such as women or African Americans, myths have emerged and, over time, have become part of the social fabric. These aging myths, which. Old Age Support in Contemporary Urban China from Both Parents’ and Children’s Perspectives. Analyses from both parents’ and children’s perspectives support the corporate group/mutual aid model, which largely sees the provision of help as dependent on elderly parents’needs and children’s capacities. The Well-Being and Family.

      China Urban is an ethnographic account of China’s cities and the place that urban space holds in China’s imagination. In addition to investigating this nation’s rapidly changing urban landscape, its contributors emphasize the need to rethink the very meaning of the “urban” and the utility of urban-focused anthropological critiques during a period of unprecedented change on/5(10). China country assessment report on ageing and health | iii Contents Acknowledgements iv Data sources v Acronyms and abbreviations vi 1. Introduction: China in transition 1 Population ageing in China 1 Health transition: a current and future issue 1 Changing family structure and traditional care arrangements 4 2.

    The increasing proportion of elderly in China is producing profound social and economic complications that require the development of appropriate policies. This article addresses this issue in a novel way, by focusing on the sandwich generation, i.e., those who oftentimes care for . The relationship between social capital and health outcomes should take into account geographical setting. Efforts to increase social capital in the hope of decreasing health disparity might be inadequate without eliminating China’s unique rural–urban distinction in distributing economic and social resources.


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Changing social position of the elderly in contemporary urban China by Pei Lin Download PDF EPUB FB2

This thesis uses an anthropological approach to examine the current social status of the young elderly in contemporary urban China and explores the problems these people are facing.

A review of literature sets up complementary theoretical frameworks for the understanding of the interaction between changing social environment and transitional Author: Pei Lin.

This book examines the various social contradictions that sit at the heart of China's strategy of maintaining a harmonious socialist society while generating vertiginous economic growth.

Edited by a senior member of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, the book discusses the roots and backgrounds of the key theories of contradiction.

Social Change in Contemporary China. Book Description: Social Change in Contemporary China offers a wide-ranging examination of Chinese institutional change in areas of education, religion, health care, economics, labor, family, and local communities in the post-Mao era. “The book highlights numerous aspects of aging in China, bringing together a range of articles that focus on social/cultural issues, political factors, and the international impact of recent economic changes in China.

Most chapters have a brief summary at the beginning that helps readers in navigating through the main issues. The book is based on a long period of research on Chinese urban development, and benefited from several research projects conducted in Chinese cities. It is an important reference for all of those interested in housing, urban studies and social change, and is a key text for students of the Chinese economy and by:   This book provides a rare glimpse into how the Chinese urban population is experiencing the rapid shift from a planned to a market economy.

Using a dozen, recent national surveys, the authors give voice to workers, civil servants, intellectuals, and women, who report their grievances and joys at home, at work, and in the public sphere.

The elderly play a pivotal role in China’s society and economy. Demographic developments, however, are threatening to undermine their key position, by changing where, how and by whom the elderly are cared for. To safeguard this tradition, China needs to embrace technological innovation and adapt the delivery of medical care to a group that is a link to its past, the foundation of.

countries China relies on families rather than a sophisticated social security system to care for the elderly, and values collectivism more than individualism.

It does not have a governing system based on Western democratic ideology. Therefore, the transformations of Chinese. “The mass rural-to-urban migration that has happened in China since the s is changing the context of family support to rural elderly people,” said John Giles, World Bank’s Senior Labor Economist and lead author of the report.

The population of the elderly (60 or older) in China is about million, or one in every 10 people. By some estimates, that puts China's sheer number of senior citizens at the largest in the world.

It is estimated that China could have up to million people over 60 years of age by the year The elderly and old age support in rural China: challenges and prospects (Chinese) Abstract. Although average incomes in China have risen dramatically since the s, concerns are increasing that the rural elderly have not benefited from growth to the same extent as younger people and the urban elderly.

Chinese Urban Life under Reform Chinese surveys dealing with urban life. the result is an impressive and persuasive summary statement of the balance of change and continuity in Chinese cities." Martin Whyte, George Washington University "A pioneering and encyclopedic study of China's urban social and political life during the economic Format: Paperback.

This book investigates how rapid socio-political-economic change in China since has affected intergenerational relationships and practices in rural areas, specifically the care provided to elderly parents by their adult children.

The psychological status and social support of empty-nest elderly is worth being discussed, this study discuss comparatively the social support, depression and its influencing factors between the empty-nest elderly living in urban and rural areas of Hunan province of China, attempts to explore the common points and differences between them, so.

The authors examined changing attitudes about filial piety, or xiao, using data from intensive interviews with 20 elderly residents, 14 family members, and 9 staff members in Nanjing, China. The findings reveal that respondents interpreted the notion of xiao in terms of their own social worlds and on the basis of their own social locations and contexts.

Several Issues Concerning Social Structure Change in China in the Past 30 Years 4. Breaking the Bifurcated Urban-Rural Structure and Realizing Economic and Social Integration of Urban and Rural Areas 5.

Theories and Methods for the Study of Contemporary Chinese Social Structure 6. Social Structural Analysis of Urban-Rural Integration and the. The migration changes the social environments of the elderly, increases the probability of social isolation. Employing the data of China Longitudinal Aging Social Survey (CLASS), this study descried the situation of social isolation of the elderly in urban China, and identified differences between floating people and local citizens.

their families than the urban elderly, who have historically had higher access to government pensions. The mass rural-to-urban migration that has happened in China since the s is changing the context of family support to rural elderly peo-ple.

This change. Social issues in China are wide-ranging, and are a combined result of Chinese economic reforms set in place in the late s, the nation's political and cultural history, and an immense population.

Due to the significant number of social problems that have existed throughout the country, China's government has faced difficulty in trying to remedy the issues.

China's aging population is as big a worry as its debt bomb, if not more so, because China can make its debt disappear at the stroke of a pen, but the government cannot make millions of elderly. There are very few books dealing with urban problems within the vast literature on system transformation.

At the same time cities are the engines of social changes, they lead to economic restructuring and transboundary integrations. The uniqueness of the book is that it gives a comprehensive view on the region's urban transformation and it presents various aspects of cities from urban .The book next documents the sources of financial support, poverty incidence and vulnerability of the rural elderly since the early s.

China?s rural elderly have been consistently poorer and more vulnerable to poverty than both working age households and the urban elderly.Get this from a library! Chinese urban life under reform: the changing social contract.

[Wenfang Tang; William L Parish] -- This book provides a rare glimpse into how the Chinese urban population is experiencing the rapid shift from a planned to a market economy.

With comparitive data from market-based Taiwan, it.